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Senior Airman Caleb George, 4th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, flies in a Wayne County Sheriff’s Office helicopter, April 18, 2017, over Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. The flight was designed to enhance the partnership and maintain proper communications between the 4th OSS ATC tower and the WCSO. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria Boyton) Air traffic controllers experience the other end of the radio
Eight Air Traffic Controllers received a flight in the Wayne County Sheriff's Office helicopters as a conclusion to a meeting with the WCSO to discuss each other’s role in aviation, April 18, 2017, at the Wayne County Executive Airport in Pikeville, North Carolina.
0 4/25
2017
Hundreds of attendees learned about more than 40 clubs at MIBCON17, March 31, 2017, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Many of the Airmen in attendance said they were looking to join a club or two with interests similar to their own. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kenneth Boyton) MIBCON17 #FindYourThing
The 2017 Make It Better convention, more commonly referred to as MIBCON17, occurred March 31, even after the event moved indoors due to inclement weather. The convention showcased Seymour Johnson Air Force Base’s initiative to create more things for Airmen and their families to do to increase morale and make the base a better place to be.
0 4/12
2017
Members of Team Seymour attend a Sexual Assault Prevention and Response seminar, April 3, 2017, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. April is recognized as Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kenneth Boyton) SAAPM: Protecting our people protects our mission
April is recognized as Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month. To help combat sexual assaults, base leadership hosted a Proclamation Ceremony, April 3, 2017, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina.
0 4/12
2017
Airman 1st Class Seth Elich, 14th Air Support Operations Squadron tactical air control party, listens to communications during exercise Razor Talon, April 7, 2017, at Atlantic Field Marine Corps Outlying Field, North Carolina. Razor Talon was created by the 4th Fighter Wing in March 2011 to prepare and sharpen the skills of aircrew for real-world missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kenneth Boyton) Strike Eagles, Warthogs and TACPs, oh my!
The opposing force scurried around the arid airfield to prepare for an oncoming attack. Without warning, a pair of A-10C Thunderbolt IIs screamed toward the airfield and simulated multiple strafing runs decimating a radar jammer.
0 4/10
2017
Seymour Johnson Air Force Base is scheduled to open its gates to the public for the 2017 Wings Over Wayne Air Show, May 20-21, 2017. Admission is free to the public.  There will be food, drink, and souvenir concessions available for purchase. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Master Sgt. Brittany Jones) 
Save the date #WOW17
Seymour Johnson Air Force Base is scheduled to open its gates to the public for the 2017 Wings Over Wayne Air Show, May 20-21, 2017.
0 4/10
2017
Col. Erik Jenkins, 916th Air Refueling Wing commander, represents Seymour Johnson Air Force Base at a Child Abuse Prevention Month Proclamation Ceremony, April 4, 2017, at Goldsboro City Hall, North Carolina. Children from Seymour Johnson and the local community showed their support by reading poems and singing songs during the ceremony. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria Boyton) Pinwheels twirling in the wind: Child Abuse Prevention
Members of Seymour Johnson AFB partnered with the city of Goldsboro to participate in a proclamation ceremony in honor of the month at City Hall in Goldsboro, North Carolina, April 4, 2017.
0 4/07
2017
The month of March is Women’s History Month. Although the month has come and gone, the women of Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, continue to come together throughout the year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Samuel King Jr./ Edits by Amn Shawna L. Keyes) BellaMorphosis; not just a gym
During the month of March, the Air Force celebrates Women’s History month. Although the month has come and gone, the women of Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, continue to come together throughout the year.
0 4/06
2017
Lt. Col. Stephen Taylor, 334th Fighter Squadron assistant director of operations, receives the traditional 
“fini flight” ritual from his wife and three children after completing his final flight in the F-15E Strike Eagle, March 30, 2017, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Taylor retires from the Air Force in June 2017 after more than 18 years as a weapon systems officer. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria Boyton) 
Finishing where it all began: Bubba’s final flight
One weapon systems officer’s story came to a close, March 30, 2017, after flying the F-15E Strike Eagle for more than 18 years and 1,642 sorties, Lt. Col. Stephen Taylor, 334th Fighter Squadron assistant director of operations, flew his final flight in the Strike Eagle.
0 4/03
2017
Lt. Col. Dave Haworth, Office of Military Cooperation at the U.S. Embassy in Qatar, discusses the F-15QA to Team Seymour leadership and his Excellency Khalid Mohammad Al Attiyah, Qatar's Minister of State for Defense Affairs, March 28, 2017, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. The presentation covered different aspects of a potential contract with Qatar to purchase more than 30 F-15QA aircraft to aid in the degradation and destruction of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kenneth Boyton) SJ showcases F-15E superiority to Qatar Minister of Defense
Qatar's Minister of State for Defense Affairs, his Excellency Dr. Khalid Mohammed Al Attiyah, visited Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, March 28, to experiences the power and capabilities of the F-15E Strike Eagle firsthand.
0 3/31
2017
According to the Federal Aviation Administration, sudden exposure to laser radiation during a critical phase of flight can distract or disorient a pilot and cause temporary visual impairment. In the United States, lasing an aircraft is a crime under the Code of Federal Aviation Regulations 14 CFR 91.11, which prohibits interfering with a flight crew operating an aircraft, with penalties up to $11,000 per violation for anyone deliberately shining a laser at an aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Shawna L. Keyes) Ground-to-air lasers: dangers, what you need to know
Imagine you’re F-15E Strike Eagle aircrew performing complex maneuvers in the black of night when all of suddenly an intensely bright light blasts the cockpit. Your windshield is instantly turned opaquely green, you’re temporarily blinded and your eyes immediately sting. You are the victim of a ground-to-air laser attack. These kinds of attacks can threaten the mission of the 4th Fighter Wing, national defense and combatant commander’s objectives at overseas locations.
0 3/29
2017
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