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Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the skyEnsuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky
Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky

The Digital Air Surveillance Radar (DASR) tower stands lit in the night sky on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 21, 2011. The DASR is vital to the F-15E Strike Eagles and KC-135 Stratotankers here, ensuring each aircraft?s location is known in the sky to avoid a mid-air collision. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Rae Perry)
Ensuring Strike ...


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Posted: 11/22/2011

Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the skyEnsuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky
Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky

Airmen work to repair obstruction lights on top of the Digital Air Surveillance Radar (DASR) tower on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 21, 2011. The DASR provides air traffic controllers with a digital view of the sky, so they can properly direct pilots through hazards such as a flock of birds, bad weather and other aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Rae Perry)
Ensuring Strike ...


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Posted: 11/22/2011

Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the skyEnsuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky
Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky

Senior Airman Khalil Giawashi removes a light bulb cover on top of the Digital Air Surveillance Radar (DASR) tower on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 21, 2011. Giawashi climbed the tower to troubleshoot why the lights, which warn pilots of the tower?s location, were not working properly. Giawashi, 4th Communication Squadron ground radar systems technician, is from Panama City, Fla. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Rae Perry)
Ensuring Strike ...


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Posted: 11/22/2011

Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the skyEnsuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky
Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky

Airman 1st Class Joseph Carpenter works to remove a pair of bolts holding a ladder in place on the back of the Digital Air Surveillance Radar (DASR) tower on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 21, 2011. The ladder slides along back of the radar to provide technicians with easier access to the internal electrical components that power the DASR. Carpenter, 4 CS ground radar systems technician, is a native of Pittsburgh. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Rae Perry)
Ensuring Strike ...


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Posted: 11/22/2011

Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the skyEnsuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky
Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky

Airman 1st Class Joseph Carpenter consults a technical order before climbing the Digital Air Surveillance Radar tower to repair an obstruction light on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 21, 2011. An obstruction light is a red light which lets aircraft in the area know there is a tall structure in a specific area so the pilot can avoid hitting it. Carpenter, 4 CS ground radar systems technician, is a native of Pittsburgh. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Rae Perry)
Ensuring Strike ...


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Posted: 11/22/2011

Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the skyEnsuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky
Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky

Senior Airman Scott Kababik checks the functions of the radar approach and control screens used by air traffic controllers to ensure they are displaying the correct information for Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 21, 2011. If a screen displays improper information, Airmen from the 4th Communications Squadron (CS) ground radar maintenance flight must troubleshoot the system to find and repair the error before the aircraft here can take to the skies. Kababik, 4 CS ground radar systems technician, is a native of Parkton, N.C. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Rae Perry)
Ensuring Strike ...


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Posted: 11/22/2011

Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the skyEnsuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky
Ensuring Strike Eagles can take to the sky

Airman 1st Class Joseph Carpenter performs a nightly check of the radar approach and control (RAPCON) system on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 21, 2011. Airmen at the RAPCON center use the Digital Air Surveillance Radar to track aircraft, large flocks of birds and weather patterns so air traffic controllers can best guide pilots through the hazards. Carpenter, 4th Communications Squadron ground radar systems technician, is a native of Pittsburgh. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Rae Perry)
Ensuring Strike ...


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Posted: 11/22/2011

Mixing it upMixing it up
Mixing it up

Staff Sgt. Marius Leak adds mortar into a mixing machine during a structural project on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 18, 2011. A mixture of water, sand and mortar mix are needed to make concrete. Leak is a 4th Civil Engineer Squadron structural craftsman and a native of High Point, N.C. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Whitney Stanfield)
Mixing it up


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Posted: 11/21/2011

Mixing it upMixing it up
Mixing it up

Tech. Sgt. James Prim pushes concrete to the top of a wall during a structural project on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 18, 2011. Concrete is inexpensive and provides a stronger foundation compared to other building materials. Prim is a 4th Civil Engineer Squadron structural craftsman and a native Mocksville, N.C. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Whitney Stanfield)
Mixing it up


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Posted: 11/21/2011

Mixing it upMixing it up
Mixing it up

John Whitfield spreads mortar onto cement blocks during a structural project on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 18, 2011. Mortar is a paste used to fill the gaps combine an construction blocks. Whitfield is a 4th Civil Engineer Squadron brick doctor from Goldsboro, N.C. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Whitney Stanfield)
Mixing it up


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Posted: 11/21/2011

Mixing it upMixing it up
Mixing it up

Staff Sgt. Kenneth Laswell uses a block trowel during a structural project on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 18, 2011. A block trowel is used in brickwork or stonework for leveling, spreading and shaping concrete. Laswell is a 4th Civil Engineer Squadron structural craftsman and a native of Corinth, Miss. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Whitney Stanfield)
Mixing it up


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Posted: 11/21/2011

Mixing it upMixing it up
Mixing it up

Staff Sgt. Marius Leak transfers concrete to co-workers during a structural project on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 18, 2011. The 4th Civil Engineer Squadron structural shop is working on a new bathroom outside of a baseball field. Leak is a 4th Civil Engineer Squadron structural craftsman and a native of High Point, N.C. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Whitney Stanfield)
Mixing it up


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Posted: 11/21/2011

    

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