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4th CES EOD flight hosts multi-base FTX

Airman 1st Class Braiden Bray, 4th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician sets up a remote move on a dud-fired hand grenade during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 27, 2021.

Airman 1st Class Braiden Bray, 4th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician sets up a remote move on a dud-fired hand grenade during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 27, 2021. A remote move is done in order to get an improvised explosive device to a controlled and secure location. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Barrera)

Staff Sgt. Hunter Eckwall, 20th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, enters a booby-trapped building during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 27, 2021.

Staff Sgt. Hunter Eckwall, 20th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, enters a booby-trapped building during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 27, 2021. Before entering the building Eckwall looked for trip wire and improvised explosive devices. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Senior Airman Kimberly Barrera)

Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians from Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, Shaw AFB, South Carolina and Andrews AFB, Maryland get familiarized with an F-15E Strike Eagle during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 26, 2021.

Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians from Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, Shaw AFB, South Carolina and Andrews AFB, Maryland get familiarized with an F-15E Strike Eagle during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 26, 2021. During the FTX, EOD members utilized the flight line for simulated F-15E crash scenario. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Barrera)

Airman 1st Class Jakobo Vasquez Cuartas, 20th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, removes a training neck bomb during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 29, 2021.

Airman 1st Class Jakobo Vasquez Cuartas, 20th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, removes a training neck bomb during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 29, 2021. Vasquez Cuartas used a knife to cut the hostage free in blackout conditions during one of the night operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Barrera)

Explosive ordnance disposal members from Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, Andrews AFB, Maryland and Shaw AFB, South Carolina, ruck march to a training site on Seymour Johnson AFB, July 25, 2021. The EOD members participated in a five-day field training exercise, Operation Guillotine. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Barrera)

Explosive ordnance disposal members from Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, Andrews AFB, Maryland and Shaw AFB, South Carolina, ruck march to a training site on Seymour Johnson AFB, July 25, 2021. The EOD members participated in a five-day field training exercise, Operation Guillotine. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Barrera) The EOD members participated in a five-day field training exercise, Operation Guillotine. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Barrera)

Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians find a training improvised explosive device during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 29, 2021.

Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians find a training improvised explosive device during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 29, 2021. The EOD technicians entered the facility in black out conditions and used a remote pull to move the IED to a secure and controlled area. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Barrera)

Airman 1st Class Jacobo Vasquez Cuartas, 20th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, looks upstairs before proceeding during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 27, 2021.

Airman 1st Class Jacobo Vasquez Cuartas, 20th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, looks upstairs before proceeding during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 27, 2021. Vasquez Cuartas found two trip wires during his search. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Barrera)

Senior Airman Joseph Plato, 4th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, uses a digital hand-held metal detector as he approaches a training roadside improvised explosive device during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 27, 2021.

Senior Airman Joseph Plato, 4th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, uses a digital hand-held metal detector as he approaches a training roadside improvised explosive device during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 27, 2021. The FTX was a multi-base exercise that gave EOD Airmen the opportunity to practice skills needed for their upgrade training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Barrera)

Staff Sgt. Damian Riley, 4th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, hooks up a remote cut and pull on a simulated improvised explosive device during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 26, 2021.

Staff Sgt. Damian Riley, 4th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, hooks up a remote cut and pull on a simulated improvised explosive device during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, July 26, 2021. The five-day FTX focused on dismounted, outside the continental United States improvised explosive device operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Barrera)

Staff Sgt. Damian Riley, front, 4th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal technician, and Airman First Class Jarrid McKenzie, 4th CES EOD technician, investigate ground signs during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, July 26, 2021.
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Staff Sgt. Damian Riley, front, 4th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal technician, and Airman First Class Jarrid McKenzie, 4th CES EOD technician, investigate ground signs during field training exercise Operation Guillotine at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, July 26, 2021. Riley and McKenzie found a training pressure plate and a simulated improvised explosive device during their investigation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Barrera)

SEYMOUR JOHNSON AIR FORCE BASE, N.C. --

Explosive Ordnance Disposal members from the 4th Civil Engineer Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina hosted and participated in field training exercise Operation Guillotine along with EOD members from Shaw AFB, South Carolina and Andrews AFB, Maryland, July 26 – July 30, 2021.

The FTX focused on dismounted, outside the continental United States improvised explosive device operations.

The training kicked-off in the morning on day one with a ruck march from the EOD shop to the range where the Airmen set up camp. By early afternoon, the teams were running scenarios. The Airmen trained day and night ensuring each participant had an adequate amount of training rounds.

“The dismounted OCONUS mission is IED driven, where we have a limited amount of gear,” said Senior Airman Bryan Price, 4th CES EOD technician. “It was performed on foot, without a vehicle, which limited our capability a ton and forced us to think on our feet.

The overall training was austere in nature to incorporate Agile Combat Employment and Multi-Capable Airmen capabilities and to test gear.

“The training incorporated MCA and ACE aspects by using the same gear that is required on those missions and camping outside,” said Price. “We do a lot of work with the same equipment which crosses over to our dismounted IED mission.”

Each training scenario prepared Airmen for a multitude of different situations, anything from gear familiarization to specific operations and mission sets. The Airmen used equipment such as radios, rifles, night vision goggles, rope reels, plate carriers, knives and a variety of personal gear during the FTX.

“It’s important that we know our equipment through and through before going outside the wire when deployed,” said Price. “At the end of the day that is what you rely on, yourself and your equipment.”

The training forced the Airmen to work in multiple environments and covered various scenarios.

“We utilized the flight line for a crash scenario, had a mock-up homemade explosive lab that was booby-trapped, some post blast scenarios as well as conventional and IED scenarios,” said Airman 1st Class Braidon Bray, 4th CES EOD technician.

The last night was a culmination of all of the training in black out conditions with simulation rounds and hostages strapped with simulated bombs in a contained area littered with trip wires and IED’s.

The extensive training provided during the FTX helped ensure EOD members maintain mission readiness.

“We rely heavily on training to get experience,” said Price. “We put a lot of effort into making each scenario as realistic as possible because that helps prepare us for the missions we will come across overseas.”

The FTX gave a realistic picture into EOD operations and prepared EOD members for situations and scenarios that they don’t regularly see on a day-to-day basis.

“The FTX was very helpful, I learned a lot going through the scenarios and watching how each technician operates,” said Bray. “We bounced ideas off of each other, looked out for one another in the field and worked as a team to successfully complete the various scenarios throughout the week.”

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