HomeNewsArticle Display

Getting Smarter: SJ enhances its emotional intelligence

Getting Smarter: SJ enhances its emotional intelligence

U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Eric Forman, 480th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Group, assists a participant in an exercise during the Emotional Intelligence Seminar Oct. 24, 2019, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Twenty Airmen across the 4 FW attended the all-day discussion to enhance their own emotional intelligence and identify ways to help those around them do them same. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael Charles)

Getting Smarter: SJ enhances its emotional intelligence

U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Eric Forman, 480th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Group, participates in an exercise during the Emotional Intelligence Seminar Oct. 24, 2019, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Twenty Airmen across the 4 FW attended the all-day discussion to enhance their own emotional intelligence and identify ways to help those around them do them same. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael Charles)

Getting Smarter: SJ enhances its emotional intelligence

Attendees participate in an exercise during the Emotional Intelligence Seminar Oct. 24, 2019, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Twenty Airmen across the 4 FW attended the all-day discussion to enhance their own emotional intelligence and identify ways to help those around them do them same. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael Charles)

Getting Smarter: SJ enhances its emotional intelligence

U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Cynthia Schmitz, 4th Operations Support Squadron superintendent, participates in an exercise during the Emotional Intelligence Seminar Oct. 24, 2019, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Twenty Airmen across the 4 FW attended the all-day discussion to enhance their own emotional intelligence and identify ways to help those around them do them same. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael Charles)

Getting Smarter: SJ enhances its emotional intelligence

U.S. Air Force Col. Joel Meyers, 4th Operations Group commander, talks to attendees of the Emotional Intelligence Seminar Oct. 24, 2019, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Twenty Airmen across the 4 FW attended the all-day discussion to enhance their own emotional intelligence and identify ways to help those around them do them same. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael Charles)

Getting Smarter: SJ enhances its emotional intelligence

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Johnathan Bott, 333rd Fighter Squadron, participates in an exercise during the Emotional Intelligence Seminar Oct. 24, 2019, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Emotional intelligence is defined as a person’s ability to recognize and understand emotions and your skill at using this awareness to manage yourself and your relationship with others. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael Charles)

SEYMOUR JOHNSON AIR FORCE BASE, N.C. -- A young lady sat in the back of the small auditorium with her eyes fixated toward the front of the room. She could feel every member in the room glaring at her. Each wondering how she would answer the question that was presented to her just moments before.

After her brief reflection, she took a deep breath and answered.

“Wanted,” she said calmly. “When I think of the best people I’ve been around; they’ve made me feel wanted.”

Suddenly, several different answers echoed throughout the room.

“Positive; open-minded; determined,” each answer coming from a different attendee sitting on opposite sides of the room.

The moderator, who at the front of the room has been writing each answer on the paper, suddenly stops. He looks at the same lady and presents a different question than he asked earlier.

“How do the worst people you’ve been around make you feel,” he asked.

The room suddenly turned silent.

Over the past few years, the military has demonstrated a concerted effort to strengthen the overall Comprehensive Airman Fitness of all Airmen currently serving. However, according to Chief Master Sgt. Eric Forman, 480th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Group superintendent and seminar moderator, the emotional pillar is often neglected due to the sensitivity and privacy that many members desire.

In an effort to improve the often-neglected CAF pillar of members on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, 4th Fighter Wing leaders invited Forman from Fort Gordon, Georgia, to lead and act as a moderator at an Emotional Intelligence Seminar Oct. 24, 2019 in the 333rd Fighter Squadron.

“Emotion stressors are inherently present in the atmosphere we operate in as members of the military,” Col. Joel Meyers, 4th Operations Group Commander. “If we can identify how to better take care of each other we can accomplish a lot more.”

Twenty Airmen across the 4 FW attended the all-day discussion to enhance their own emotional intelligence and identify ways to help those around them do the same. Emotional intelligence is defined as a person’s ability to recognize and understand emotions, and your skill at using this awareness to manage yourself and your relationship with others.
“Being in the military, we are well aware of the stresses both physical and emotional associated with a constant focus on the mission,” said Lt. Col Johnathan Bott, 333rd Fighter Squadron commander. “Being able to better identify how people are feeling through their non-verbal actions or engagement will help us bring the balance to the people we lead.”

During the seminar, members were able to share their own emotional stressors and identify how to recognize and cope with stressful situations. This was often done in groups aimed at encouraging members to talk about what affects them and developing strategies to engage others emotionally.

“Emotional intelligence isn’t always about identifying and knowing what to say in times of emotional stress of others,” Forman said. “It is also about understanding the behavioral changes associated with emotional stress within yourself.”

One of the group exercises involved having each member discuss an unspoken normality at the workplace and drawing the emotional consequence of those social norms. The exercise helped members identify commonalities of how they feel emotionally while doing their work.

“As humans when tend to deal with social norms that we have certain feelings about with toxic positivity,” Forman said. “It can come off ingenuine. This exercise was meant to showcase to each member that we have more in common than we think and that emotional empathy goes a long way.”

According to Meyers, the hope of the training was to further develop frontline leaders, who are capable of having deeper emotional conversations with those around them.

“It isn’t always easy to have these conversations, Meyers said. “However, it is very important in maintaining the wellbeing of our Airmen in this fast paced, military environment that we operate.”

At the conclusion of the seminar, each person was given an assessment. Its purpose was to highlight each attendee’s strengths and weaknesses based on four categories; self-awareness, self-management, social awareness and relationship management. By doing so, it provides tools necessary to improve how each attendee caters to the emotional fitness of those around them.

“These assessments will help identify blind spots and strengths for each individual who received one,” Forman said. “Most importantly, it shows the emotional fitness of those around you. Hopefully, we have given you the tools to make intelligent responses going forward.”
USAF Comments Policy
If you wish to comment, use the text box below. AF reserves the right to modify this policy at any time.

This is a moderated forum. That means all comments will be reviewed before posting. In addition, we expect that participants will treat each other, as well as our agency and our employees, with respect. We will not post comments that contain abusive or vulgar language, spam, hate speech, personal attacks, violate EEO policy, are offensive to other or similar content. We will not post comments that are spam, are clearly "off topic", promote services or products, infringe copyright protected material, or contain any links that don't contribute to the discussion. Comments that make unsupported accusations will also not be posted. The AF and the AF alone will make a determination as to which comments will be posted. Any references to commercial entities, products, services, or other non-governmental organizations or individuals that remain on the site are provided solely for the information of individuals using this page. These references are not intended to reflect the opinion of the AF, DoD, the United States, or its officers or employees concerning the significance, priority, or importance to be given the referenced entity, product, service, or organization. Such references are not an official or personal endorsement of any product, person, or service, and may not be quoted or reproduced for the purpose of stating or implying AF endorsement or approval of any product, person, or service.

Any comments that report criminal activity including: suicidal behaviour or sexual assault will be reported to appropriate authorities including OSI. This forum is not:

  • This forum is not to be used to report criminal activity. If you have information for law enforcement, please contact OSI or your local police agency.
  • Do not submit unsolicited proposals, or other business ideas or inquiries to this forum. This site is not to be used for contracting or commercial business.
  • This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, informal or formal complaint, or any other form of legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy.

AF does not guarantee or warrant that any information posted by individuals on this forum is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. AF may not be able to verify, does not warrant or guarantee, and assumes no liability for anything posted on this website by any other person. AF does not endorse, support or otherwise promote any private or commercial entity or the information, products or services contained on those websites that may be reached through links on our website.

Members of the media are asked to send questions to the public affairs through their normal channels and to refrain from submitting questions here as comments. Reporter questions will not be posted. We recognize that the Web is a 24/7 medium, and your comments are welcome at any time. However, given the need to manage federal resources, moderating and posting of comments will occur during regular business hours Monday through Friday. Comments submitted after hours or on weekends will be read and posted as early as possible; in most cases, this means the next business day.

For the benefit of robust discussion, we ask that comments remain "on-topic." This means that comments will be posted only as it relates to the topic that is being discussed within the blog post. The views expressed on the site by non-federal commentators do not necessarily reflect the official views of the AF or the Federal Government.

To protect your own privacy and the privacy of others, please do not include personally identifiable information, such as name, Social Security number, DoD ID number, OSI Case number, phone numbers or email addresses in the body of your comment. If you do voluntarily include personally identifiable information in your comment, such as your name, that comment may or may not be posted on the page. If your comment is posted, your name will not be redacted or removed. In no circumstances will comments be posted that contain Social Security numbers, DoD ID numbers, OSI case numbers, addresses, email address or phone numbers. The default for the posting of comments is "anonymous", but if you opt not to, any information, including your login name, may be displayed on our site.

Thank you for taking the time to read this comment policy. We encourage your participation in our discussion and look forward to an active exchange of ideas.